Electric Motors for Electric Vehicles 2012-2022

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Electric Motors for Electric Vehicles 2012-2022

Electric Motors for Electric Vehicles

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This report covers the technical and market trends for industrial and commercial vehicles whether hybrid or pure electric, putting it in the context of electric vehicles overall and including the activities of a host of manufacturers of the vehicles and their components and even providing future technological development roadmaps.

The market for electric industrial vehicles is already large because, by law, forklifts have to be electric when used indoors. Little growth remains in this market but outdoors almost all earthmoving and lifting vehicles use the conventional internal combustion engine. That is about to change dramatically because hybrid electric versions reduce cost of ownership and exposure to price hikes with fossil fuels. Hybrids increasingly perform better as well, with more power from stationary, ability to supply electricity to other equipment and other benefits including less noise and pollution. On the other hand, airports, often government owned or funded, are under great pressure to finish converting their Ground Support Equipment GSE to pure electric versions both on and off the tarmac partly using federal grants.

Yet another industrial trend is for use of electric vehicles to replace slow and often dangerous manual procedures. Sometimes a self-powered indoor crane replaces scaffolding. An electric stair climber replaces human effort and possible injury. On the other hand, sit-on floor cleaners in buildings, sit-on ice cleaners in ice rinks, outrider vehicles carried on trash collection trucks and a host of similar solutions speed processes and reduce injuries and costs.

Buses, trucks, taxis and the other light industrial and commercial vehicles are going electric for similar reasons but we must add the desire of national and local governments, who buy many of them, to go green, even where there is no payback. However, the size and growth of the industrial and commercial sector is less dependent on government funding and tax breaks than the more fragile market for electric cars, particularly pure electric ones. Excitingly, most of the electric vehicle technologies are changing and improving hugely and innovation often comes here before it is seen in the more publicised electric vehicle sectors such as cars.

Asynchronous traction motors were first widely used on forklifts: their benefits of longer life, less maintenance, low cost and freedom from magnet price hikes and heating problems are only later being seen in a few cars. Ultracapacitors otherwise known as supercapacitors permit very fast charging of buses whether by the new Level 3 charging stations or regenerative braking and they release huge surges of power when the bus is full and starting on a hill. Gas turbine range extenders have been on some buses for 12 years but they are only now being planned for cars. Fuel cells will be viable in fleets where the expensive hydrogen distribution is manageable – not for cars across the world. Energy harvesting shock absorbers about to hit the market will be very viable on buses and trucks where they can put up to 12 kW into the battery whereas such devices on cars will take longer to prove.

Nevertheless, it is important to look at industrial and commercial electric vehicles as part of all electric vehicles out there – as we do – because it is increasingly true that one company will produce EVs for many end uses and even make key components. This achieves the product reliability and cost advantages that come from highest volume manufacture based on standardisation and shared research.

Main areas the report covers

The report provides forecasts of the heavy industrial, light industrial & commercial, bus and taxi global markets by numbers, ex-factory price and total market value for the coming decade. In addition to chapters on these sectors, there are chapters on the market drivers, the key technologies and their future trends all pulled together with summary charts, graphs and profiles of latest company activity.

Who should buy this report?

Those developing or making electric vehicles of all types. Those purchasing industrial and commercial electric vehicles. Other interested parties such as service providers, technology researchers, investors and government legislators and supports of the industry.

Forecasts

Industrial and commercial electric vehicles represent 60% of the value of the electric vehicle market today and their market value will grow 4.2 times in the next decade. The report gives ten year forecasts by sector, explaining exactly why some sub sectors will see stellar growth and others will see very little growth.

Publisher >> IDTechEx
Report Category: Utilities

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
1.1. Traction motor forecasts of numbers
1.2. Global value market for vehicle traction motors
1.3. Definition and background
1.4. Shape of motors
1.5. Location of motors
1.6. Unique major new survey
2. INTRODUCTION
2.1. History of electric traction motors
2.2. Types of motor favoured in electric vehicles
2.2.1. Types of traction motor in summary
2.2.2. Asynchronous traction motors
2.2.3. Size and number of motors
2.2.4. Shapes of motor
2.2.5. Synchronous traction motors
2.2.6. Axial flux vs radial flux motors
2.3. Sophisticated motors bridging gaps in performance
2.3.1. Advanced asynchronous motor variant – Chorus Motors
2.3.2. Advanced synchronous PM motor – Protean Electric
2.3.3. Motor position
2.3.4. The relative merits of the motor positions in electric bicycles and e-bikes
2.3.5. Fraunhofer IFAM
2.4. Remaining challenges
2.4.1. In-wheel hybrids
2.4.2. Electric corner modules (ECMs)
2.4.3. SIM Drive in wheel traction
2.4.4. In wheel motors for aircraft
2.4.5. Move to high voltage
2.4.6. Environmental challenges
2.4.7. Many options and many needs
2.4.8. Lack of standards
3. ANALYSIS OF 123 TRACTION MOTOR MANUFACTURERS
4. 212 ELECTRIC VEHICLES AND THEIR MOTORS
5. INTERVIEWS AND NEWLY REPORTED OPINION ON MOTOR TRENDS
5.1. Asynchronous vs Synchronous
5.2. Axial vs radial flux
5.3. Who will succeed with electric microcars
5.4. Extending the market
5.5. Barefoot motor ATV motor in place
6. MARKET FORECASTS
6.1. Traction motor forecasts of numbers
6.2. Global value market for vehicle traction motors
6.3. Definition and background
6.4. Shape of motors
6.5. Location of motors
6.6. Unique major new survey
APPENDIX 1: GLOSSARY
APPENDIX 2: IDTECHEX PUBLICATIONS AND CONSULTANCY
TABLES
1.1. Number of traction motors in electric vehicles worldwide 2011-2022 in thousands
1.2. Vehicle numbers (thousand) 2011-2022
1.3. Number of traction motors in multi-motor vehicles 2011-2022 and percentage of all vehicle traction motors rounded
1.4. Proportion of electric vehicles with more than one motor 2011-2022
1.5. Number of electric vehicles with more than one electric motor 2011-2022 in thousands and percentage of all electric vehicles rounded
1.6. Average number of motors per multi-motor vehicle 2011-2021
1.7. Proportion of electric vehicles with one motor 2011-2022
1.8. Number of electric vehicles with one electric motor ie number of motors in single-motor vehicles in thousands
1.9. Price of traction motor(s) to vehicle manufacturer in $K per vehicle
1.10. Motor market value $K paid by vehicle manufacturer 2011-2022
1.11. Summary of preferences of traction motor technology for vehicles
1.12. Advantages vs disadvantages of brushed vs brushless vehicle traction motors for today's vehicles
1.13. Most likely winners and losers in the next decade
1.14. Supplier numbers listed by continent
1.15. Traction motor supplier numbers listed by country in alphabetical order
1.16. Applications targeted by our sample of motor suppliers vs market split, listed in order of 2012 market size
1.17. Suppliers of vehicle traction motors – split between number offering asynchronous, synchronous and both, where identified
1.18. Suppliers offering brushed, brushless and both types of synchronous motors, where identified
1.19. Distribution of vehicle sample by applicational sector
1.20. Vehicles with asynchronous, synchronous or both options by category in number and percentage of category, listed in order of declining asynchronous percentage
1.21. 212 electric vehicle models analysed by category for % asynchronous, power and torque of their electric traction motors and where intensive or rough use is most typically encountered. The rated power and traction data are enhanced
1.22. Percentage of old and abandoned models in the survey that use asynchronous or synchronous motors
1.23. Number of vehicles surveyed that have a mention of using brushed DC synchronous motors, by type of vehicle
1.24. Other motor features declared by vehicle manufacturers
1.25. Number of cars sampled that had one, two, three or four traction electric motors
1.26. Ex factory unit price of EVs, in thousands of US dollars, sold globally, 2012-2022, by applicational sector, rounded
2.1. 2000 year history of electric traction motors and allied technologies
2.2. The main choices of electric vehicle traction motor technology over the next decade.
2.3. A comparison of potential and actual electric traction motor technologies
2.4. Comparison of outerrotor and innerrotor motors
2.5. Relative merits of the motor positions in electric bicycles and e-bikes
2.6. Extracts from some Azure Dynamics traction motor specifications
2.7. Extracts from some ABB traction motor specifications in imperial units
3.1. 123 vehicle traction motor manufacturers by name, country, asynchronous/synchronous, targeted vehicle types, claims and images
3.2. Supplier numbers listed by continent
3.3. Supplier numbers listed by country
3.4. Targetted applications vs market split.
3.5. Suppliers of vehicle traction motors – split between number offering asynchronous, synchronous and both, where identified.
3.6. Suppliers offering brushed, brushless and both types of synchronous motors, where identified.
3.7. Examples of train traction motor suppliers
4.1. 212 electric vehicle manufacturers, vehicle examples, asynchronous or synchronous motor used, motor details where given, motor manufacturer and number of motors per vehicle.
4.2. Market value split over the next decade between different vehicle categories
4.3. Vehicles with asynchronous, synchronous or both options by category in number and percentage of category, listed in order of declining asynchronous percentage.
4.4. 212 electric vehicle models analysed by category
4.5. Percentage of old and abandoned models in the survey that use asynchronous or synchronous motors
4.6. Number of vehicles surveyed that have a mention of using DC synchronous motors, by type of vehicle
4.7. Number of cars sampled that had one, two, three or four traction electric motors
4.8. Summary of preferences of traction motor technology for vehicles.
4.9. Most mentioned motor suppliers
6.1. Number of traction motors in electric vehicles worldwide 2011-2022 in thousands
6.2. Vehicle numbers (thousand) 2011-2022
6.3. Number of traction motors in multi-motor vehicles 2011-2022 and percentage of all vehicle traction motors rounded
6.4. Proportion of electric vehicles with more than one motor 2011-2022
6.5. Number of electric vehicles with more than one electric motor 2011-2022 in thousands and percentage of all electric vehicles rounded
6.6. Average number of motors per multi-motor vehicle 2011-2021
6.7. Proportion of electric vehicles with one motor 2011-2022
6.8. Number of electric vehicles with one electric motor ie number of motors in single-motor vehicles in thousands
6.9. Price of traction motor(s) to vehicle manufacturer in $K per vehicle
6.10. Motor market value $K paid by vehicle manufacturer 2011-2022
6.11. Summary of preferences of traction motor technology for vehicles
6.12. Advantages vs disadvantages of brushed vs brushless vehicle traction motors for today's vehicles
6.13. Most likely winners and losers in the next decade
6.14. Supplier numbers listed by continent
6.15. Traction motor supplier numbers listed by country in alphabetical order
6.16. Applications targeted by our sample of motor suppliers vs market split, listed in order of 2012 market size
6.17. Suppliers of vehicle traction motors – split between number offering asynchronous, synchronous and both, where identified
6.18. Suppliers offering brushed, brushless and both types of synchronous motors, where identified
6.19. Distribution of vehicle sample by applicational sector
6.20. Vehicles with asynchronous, synchronous or both options by category in number and percentage of category, listed in order of declining asynchronous percentage
6.21. 212 electric vehicle models analysed by category for % asynchronous, power and torque of their electric traction motors and where intensive or rough use is most typically encountered. The rated power and traction data are enhanced
6.22. Percentage of old and abandoned models in the survey that use asynchronous or synchronous motors
6.23. Number of vehicles surveyed that have a mention of using brushed DC synchronous motors, by type of vehicle
6.24. Other motor features declared by vehicle manufacturers
6.25. Number of cars sampled that had one, two, three or four traction electric motors
6.26. Ex factory unit price of EVs, in thousands of US dollars, sold globally, 2012-2022, by applicational sector, rounded
FIGURES
1.1. Number of traction motors in electric vehicles worldwide 2011-2022 in thousands
1.2. Motor market value $K paid by vehicle manufacturer 2011-2022
1.3. Location of motors sold in 2022 in vehicles in which they are fitted, in millions of motors and percent of all motors with all figures rounded. Figures in red refer to high priced motors and figures in green refer to low priced mo
1.4. Supplier numbers listed by continent
1.5. Traction motor supplier numbers listed by country
1.6. Targeted applications on top vs market value split in 2012 centre and 2022 on bottom
1.7. Suppliers of vehicle traction motors – split between number offering asynchronous, synchronous and both, where identified
1.8. Number of vehicles surveyed that have a mention of using brushed DC synchronous motors, by type of vehicle
1.9. Number of cars sampled that had one, two, three or four traction electric motors
1.10. Ex factory unit price of EVs, in thousands of US dollars, sold globally, 2012-2022, by applicational sector, rounded
1.11. Ex factory value of EVs, in billions of US dollars, sold globally, 2012-2022, by applicational sector, rounded and percentage spent on their traction motors
1.12. Ex factory value of EVs, in billions of US dollars, sold globally, 2012-2022, by applicational sector, rounded
2.1. Cri Cri motors
2.2. Multiple electric motors on a NASA solar powered, unmanned aircraft for the upper atmosphere
2.3. Drop in electric motor for manual car conversion using direct drive.
2.4. Bicycle hub motor rotor left and stator right.
2.5. Axial flux in-wheel motor driving a bicycle and a propeller.
2.6. 60/15 kW Chorus Meshcon motor
2.7. Protean in-wheel motor for on-road vehicles
2.8. Innovative electric bicycle motor
2.9. A motorcycle with off-center motor near hub.
2.10. Mitsubishi in-wheel applications
2.11. Construction of an in-wheel motor
2.12. Mitsubishi in-wheel motor
2.13. Lohner-Porsche electric vehicle of 1898
2.14. Volvo ReCharge concept hybrid
2.15. Fraunhofer in-wheel motor on an Artega GT
2.16. Mine resistant ambush protected – All Terrain Vehicle MATV
2.17. MATV structure
2.18. SIM Drive in-wheel traction
2.19. EMRAX 222 Duplex Motor
2.20. Traction battery pack nominal energy storage vs battery pack voltage for mild hybrids in red, plug in hybrids in blue and pure electric cars in green
2.21. Thruster for Deepflight personal submarine
2.22. Propulsion systems of a swimmer AUV
2.23. CERV
2.24. CERV motor integration
4.1. Other motor features declared by vehicle manufacturers.
6.1. Number of traction motors in electric vehicles worldwide 2011-2022 in thousands
6.2. Motor market value $K paid by vehicle manufacturer 2011-2022
6.3. Location of motors sold in 2022 in vehicles in which they are fitted, in millions of motors and percent of all motors with all figures rounded. Figures in red refer to high priced motors and figures in green refer to low priced mo
6.4. Supplier numbers listed by continent
6.5. Traction motor supplier numbers listed by country
6.6. Targeted applications on top vs market value split in 2012 centre and 2022 on bottom
6.7. Suppliers of vehicle traction motors – split between number offering asynchronous, synchronous and both, where identified
6.8. Number of vehicles surveyed that have a mention of using brushed DC synchronous motors, by type of vehicle
6.9. Number of cars sampled that had one, two, three or four traction electric motors
6.10. Ex factory unit price of EVs, in thousands of US dollars, sold globally, 2012-2022, by applicational sector, rounded
6.11. Ex factory value of EVs, in billions of US dollars, sold globally, 2012-2022, by applicational sector, rounded and percentage spent on their traction motors
6.12. Ex factory value of EVs, in billions of US dollars, sold globally, 2012-2022, by applicational sector, rounded

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3 comments:

  1. Jeff Hardy said...:

    interesting post. Now you can use this india exporter importer directory to promote electric motors import & export business.

  1. Jeff Hardy said...:

    interesting post. Now you can use this india manufacturers directory to promote electric motors import & export business.

  1. A great post with out doubt. The information shared is of top quality which has to get appreciated at all levels. Well done keep up the good work.
    Lou Lentine

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